The risk associated with a known three year old Trojan-type virus called Clampi has gone from low to extremely high due the sophisticated exploit created and being executed by an Eastern European cyber-crime group.

Just as businesses can differentiate themselves by applying creative processes to commodity technology, so now are cyber-criminals. Clampi has been around since 2007. Symantec as of July 23, 2009 considered the risk posed by Clampi as Risk Level 1: Very Low. I don’t mean to pick on Symantec. McAfee, which calls the virus LLomo, has the Risk Level set to Low as of July 16, 2009. TrendMicro’s ThreatInfo site was so slow, I gave up trying to find the Risk Level they chose.

The exploit process used was first reported (to my knowledge) by Brian Krebs of the Washington Post on July 20, 2009.

On July 29, 2009, Joe Stewart, Director of Malware Research for the Counter Threat Unit (CTU) of SecureWorks released a summary of his research about Clampi and how it’s being used, just prior to this week’s Black Hat Security Conference in Las Vegas.

Clampi is a Trojan-type virus which, when installed on your desktop or
laptop, can be used by this cyber-crime group to steal financial data,
apparently including User Identification and Password credentials used
for online banking and other types of online commerce. Apparently, this
Eastern European cyber-crime group controls a large number of PC’s
infected with Clampi and is stealing money from both consumers and
businesses.

Brian Krebs of the Washington Post ran a story on July 2, 2009 about a similar exploit using a different PC-based Trojan called Zeus. $415,000 was stolen from Bullitt County, KY.

Trojans like Clampi and Zeus have been around for years. What makes these exploits so high risk is the methods by which these Trojans infect us and the sophistication of the exploits’ processes for extracting money from bank accounts.

Security has always been a “cat-and-mouse” game where the bad guys develop new exploits and the good guys respond. So now I am sure we are going to see the creativity of the security vendor industry applied to reducing the risk associated with this type of exploit. At the most basic level, firewalls need to be much more application and user aware. Intrusion detection systems may already be able to detect some aspect of this type of exploit. We also need better anomaly detection capabilities.

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